The Sunset Walk

  • By Andy Tenerife Walker
  • 31 Jul, 2016

My walks are not always excessively long or strenuous as is the case with the Roques de García Walk. But this walk is absolutely spectacular with fantastic rock formations everywhere and a must for geology enthusiasts.

This walk is 6 Km in length with a moderate ascent of 275 m and takes about 2 to 2 ½ hours to complete.

Teide National Park was declared a National Park in 1954 and is one of the oldest in Spain; it has been a World Heritage Site since 2007 and attracts some 3 million visitors a year. The aboriginal Guanches thought that Teide was the gate to hell and they called it “Echeyde”.

During the walk there is plenty of evidence of the 2 main types of lava flow. Pahoehoe lava is smooth and often ropy in texture, whereas AA lava is characterised by broken blocks called clinker. Also in abundance are fantastic geological rock structures having been formed by the erosion of wind and rain over millennium. These strange shaped pinnacles are found here on the Caldera floor at some 2000 m above sea level. The most famous is called The Finger of God, “Cinchado”. The vast majority of these sculptures are composed of volcanic breccia.

On this particular day we spotted a Great Grey Strike (Lanius Excubitor Koenigi) just sitting there on Pahoehoe lava. This handsome black and grey bird spends much of its time on a perch waiting for prey. It is often found in the National Park where it catches lizards, mice and other small birds and insects.

All the Canary Islands are volcanic having arisen from the sea floor. Tenerife began its emergence about 8 million years ago. In terms of the geological clock, this is very young, eg. some rocks in Scotland are 350 million years old. Around 8 million years ago 3 volcanoes emerged from the sea to start the process of building Tenerife, these are known today as the Anaga peninsula (NE), the Teno (NW) and Conde (S) areas . From around 3 million years ago volcanic activity was focused in the centre of these and formed a massive volcano called Las Cañadas. This was much higher than the present day Teide. Then, approximately 600,000 years ago it erupted spewing lava and pyrocast deposits over the southern plains. This led to it imploding and forming the impressive Caldera we see today which has a diameter of 16 Km. After its collapse Picos Teide and Viejo began to form around 200,000 years ago. Although Mount Teide is still an active volcano as you can smell the Sulphur emissions when sitting on the summit. Teide has not erupted from its peak since modern records began in 1492, the year of the Spanish Conquest of the islands. However, there have been several eruptions from its flanks principally 1705, 1706, 1798 and 1909.

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Andy Walker Tenerife

By Andy Tenerife Walker 24 Sep, 2017

After what seems like a very long hot summer which is still with us, the winter hiking season is nearly here and bookings are coming in thick and fast.

In Tenerife, we have some of the most fabulous walks and hikes you could imagine and Tenerife Guided Walks cater for all fitness levels and aspirations. So if you are coming to Tenerife why not come and explore what the island has to offer with Andy Tenerife Walker as your guide.

You can be assured that your guided walks with us will be both memorable and the very best that Tenerife has to offer. Taking you from magnificent gorges and dramatic cliffs, to lush green Pine and Laurel forest trails, and high mountain peaks where the eagles soar on high.

For more information see:

www.tenerife-guided-walks.com

or email us, andy@tenerife-guided-walks.com

Tel/Whatsapp: + 34 630 589966

By Andy Tenerife Walker 19 Jun, 2017

Call me a romantic, but I adore woodland and forest rambles above all other landscapes in which to roam. I think this is due to the fairy tale scenery that invokes my imagination and fills my senses with joy.

Whilst in La Gomera last week, Andy Tenerife Walker took me for a beautiful walk in el Parque Nacional de Garajonay which started on the outskirts of the forest which is covered in mostly Laurel. The trees were adorned with moss which dangled from their branches like garlands. A fine mist clung to the canopy and danced through its branches.  I was expecting a witch on a broom stick to appear at any moment.

We soon left the forest and entered woodland as we ascended many log lined steps painstakingly put there by the local council to provide good passage along the way. The path and steps were lined with wax myrtle or tree heath and many early summer flowers.

The high point of this hike (in more ways than one) was our destination, el Alto de Garajonay, the highest point in La Gomera which is steeped in history and famous for a local legend. On a clear day you can see Tenerife with magnificent Mount Teide dominating the skyline, La Palma and El Hierro. This is a sacred mountain which stands at 1,483m above sea level. Here are the remains of a 6th century place of worship where the Guanches worshipped their God “Orahan” as they did on all mountain tops because they felt closer to heaven. During archaeological excavations, remains of animal sacrifices and burnt plants and flowers were discovered here. This was also the final holdout point during the Spanish Conquest, some 9 centuries later. This sacred site gave me a feeling of spirituality, as I couldn’t help but try to imagine what the Guanche’s day to day lives were like, what they believed in, and who the people were that worshipped here all those years ago. At this point, I will just mention the famous local legend of how Garajonay got its name. It is said that some time before the Spanish Conquest, a beautiful princess called Gara lived on La Gomera who fell in love with a peasant’s son from Tenerife called Jonay. He used to sail to La Gomera nearly every day to visit his love, but it was a love that was doomed as a priest predicted a great misfortune for the couple. As they were about to be married, a powerful earthquake shook Tenerife. Our magnificent Mount Teide spewed lava from its mighty summit and the sea around La Gomera turned red and the island of La Gomera began to glow. Gara’s family thought this an omen from God and forced Jonay back to Tenerife. His love for Jonay was so strong, he returned to meet her a little while later and they ran away and hid in the forest high up on the island. The lovers could see no way forward so they took the drastic steps of taking their own lives by stabbing themselves in their chests with lances made of Laurel and then died in each other’s arms. Ever since, the National Park in La Gomera remembers these 2 famous lovers in its name: Garajonay.

Having left the pinnacle of this holy place, our return journey was a gentle descent, again, through very pretty woodland. Here flowers were out in profusion in various shades of purple and yellow including the Gomera endemics Pericallis street ziti, Micromedias, and Tolpis proustii. White daisies were in profusion and really at their best which carpeted the sides of the paths. Here, we also saw many butterflies including Red Admirals Vanessa atalanta , and the Canary (Indian) Red Admiral Vanessa vulcanica . There were also many bees sipping the nectar of purple thistles and what seemed like 100s of swifts darting to and fro at breakneck speeds, feeding on the air.

This beautiful short walk fulfilled my rambling wish list: forest, woodland, pretty flowers, wildlife, stunning views, and history and romance were the icing on the cake.

This trip to la Gomera was a research and development exercise as Tenerife Guided Walks will be offering 5 day walking holidays on this beautiful island in May and June next year. If this is of interest to you, then please do contact us in good time for further information.

By Andy Tenerife Walker 18 May, 2017

Last Sunday, Andy took me and some friends to the National Park here in Tenerife on the hunt for the famous Tajinastes that are endemic to our beautiful island.

Andy had selected yet another trail that I had never done which started at Boca Tauce along a good path with dramatic mountain cliffs to our left and stunning views over to the lava fields and magnificent Mount Teide to our right.

As we progressed, we walked a short while over the lava fields; the dark charcoal-like stones crunching beneath our feet like gravel. A little further on, huge spectacular Tajinastes echium wildpretii came into sight, their strange red conical shapes thrusting their heads up to 3m high into the air. Also known as the tower of jewels and tajinaste rojo by the locals, this bizarre but beautiful plant is mainly found in the subalpine zone of Las Cañades de Teide. These beautiful flowers were adorned by many bees eagerly searching for nectar. These strange plants only grow in altitudes of more than 2,000m and only flower every 2 years.

Having done a different Tajinaste trail with Andy last year, it was obvious that this year is a poor year for flowers as the grey skeletons of last year’s blooms were in profusion, but plants in flower were not so prolific. This was not too bad a disappointment as many other flowers were in abundance including several species of lavender and bright yellow sticky broom adenocarpus viscosus which grow in large clumps and adorn the National Park like brightly coloured pin cushions.

Needless to say, photo opportunities were plenty, not only for the Tajinastes and other flowers that we found, but for the sheer drama and wonder of the lava flows, strange rock formations and awe inspiring cliffs that surrounded us.

Photograph courtesy of Mike Belshaw.

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By Andy Tenerife Walker 01 Mar, 2017

I spent a fabulous and exhausting day climbing up to 9000 feet today in Tenerife.

 

It was really hard going for quite a bit of the uphill walk, but well worth it when we saw the view of volcano El Teide. Our guide was Andy Tenerife Walker from Tenerife Guided Walks who picked us up from where we are staying, took us on the walk with about 8 other walkers, and brought us back again.

 

The walk we did was the Wow Factor walk in the Parque Nacional del Teide. This hike took us through open volcanic landscape and Pine forest and the scenery was stunning. It was about 12k in distance and took about 5 hours in total. I can’t wait to come back and do some more…

 

17th February 2017

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By Andy Tenerife Walker 28 Jan, 2017

TENERIFE – A HIKER’S PARADISE

 

Here at Tenerife Guided Walks we are incredibly lucky to live and work in Tenerife with its spectacular scenery and diverse landscapes, not to mention our year-round temperate climate! This all makes the island of Tenerife ideal for hiking at any time of the year but particularly late September through to early May. Springtime hiking is a must here for the flowers and bird life.

 

Not to brag or anything, but Tenerife is an island home to rugged coastlines, magnificent gorges, lush forests, picturesque villages, wide open moon-like landscapes, and of course our very own mountain Pico del Teide; the third highest volcano in the world and the highest mountain in Spain.

 

Tenerife has an 800 km network of tracks, forest trails and mountain paths there waiting to be discovered by the intrepid walker. We have 4 types of hikes for visitors to discover: coastal plains and rugged coastline, villages and surrounding countryside, Laurel and Pine forest and high mountain/volcanic.

 

1.     Coastal hikes:

 

Tenerife is of course surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean and features a wide range of coastal trails with stunning views of the sea and the other islands, offering an irresistible attraction to hikers and ramblers. These walks offer spectacular scenery with sheer cliff drops down to the sea, and sea-level walks along rugged coastline and sandy beaches both of which give stunning sunsets from late afternoon to early evening, depending upon the time of year. These trails are ideal to enjoy the wild scenery of the island’s coastline.

 

2.     Villages and surrounding countryside:

 

Just like Spain, Tenerife has some very pretty villages, some of which are almost hidden. Until recent years, many have been almost cut off until the 1950s/1960s when roads were first introduced. Prior to this, some of these villages were only entered by a dirt track! There are many walks that can be found in only a short drive from the coastal resorts which explore the small villages and the surrounding farmland, forests and hills. Many of these villages are steeped in both Guanche and post-Conquest history and are there to be discovered – if only you can find them!

 

3.    Forest hikes:

 

There are basically two types of forests here in Tenerife; Laurisilva (Laurel) and Canarian Pine.

 

The laurel forests are to be found in isolated regions on the north coast of the island, predominantly in the Anaga Rural Park, Teno Rural Park and Las Lagunetas Nature Reserve. These zones are known locally as the cloud forest and consist of mainly evergreen trees and shrubs. They form a dense canopy where little light reaches the floor and so many endemic shrubs and herbs exist. The Laurel forest is a type of humid forest which was more wide spread in the Mediterranean 1000s of years ago, but it now an ecotype confined to a few Macronesian islands including Tenerife.

 

These forests attract the vast seas of clouds known locally as El Mar de Nubes. This amazing natural phenomenon caused by the trade winds is one of the main reasons that Tenerife has a ready supply of natural water. Also known locally as the elixir of life.

 

The other type of forest is the Corona Forestal that translates as the forest crown because it encircles the island and is the densest forest in the archipelago. Dominated by the Canarian Pine, this forest is quite different to that of the Laurisilva in that the highest areas reach over 2,000 meters in altitude and samples of evergreen wax myrtle and heather shrubs can also be found. The entire forest is rich in endemic flora and fauna. The Pine trees are home to many indigenous birdlife, namely the Blue Chaffinch and the Great Spotted Woodpecker.

 

High Mountain/Volcanic hikes:

 

You may not see smoking volcanos ready to expel lava since the last eruption in Tenerife took place in 1909 from a volcano called Chinyero. However, you can trek through Mars-like environments such as Teide National Park. Tenerife is a unique environment for volcanism; a corner of the planet gathering all the known manifestations of this phenomenon. Film Directors regularly take advantage of this stunning scenery, and many famous films have been shot on location here such as Clash of the Titans to name but one.

 

For those looking for more challenging hikes there are a range of walks for the adventurous that will take you into the high mountains, along spectacular ridges and through dramatic lunar landscapes. You also have the opportunity to ascend to over 2,500 meters walking at high altitude enjoying some of the most spectacular views available on the Island. Also, of course, there is the Teide 2 Day Trek to hike Spain’s highest mountain, Mount Teide, to witness the longest sunrise shadow in the world.

 

 

Hiking is an incredible way to keep fit, get a workout and experience something both beautiful and exhilarating.   A hike is a very enjoyable way to experience Tenerife’s great outdoors.

 

Why not come and explore it with me?

 

Andy Tenerife Walker

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By Andy Tenerife Walker 28 Jan, 2017

By Lynne Scaife

 

Having done this incredible hike once more again last week, I simply had to put pen to paper straight away and extol the beauty of this wondrous gorge and village. There’s only one way to see the gorge (or barranco in Spanish) and that is to hike it.

 

After a short boat ride from the harbour at Los Gigantes to the bay at Masca, we began our ascent.

 

The views during the first hour are very dramatic in the dry river bed as there are some rather large rocks and boulders to negotiate. Along the way we passed some little pools of water but sometimes in winter the pools are much larger, fed by cascades of water from the numerous waterfalls down to the sea.

 

The walk is lined with cactus, shrubs and many flowers and much of the flora is endemic to the area. I was surprised to see so many flowers in bloom, but it seems that spring has come early again this year to Tenerife. Bamboos were in profusion which lined our path that eventually leads on to a small plateau.

 

As we continued on our way, we stopped at many points to take photographs, the imposing grey black “Gigantes” always within our sight which meet the deep blue colours of the sea. As we got further into the barranco, the paths became narrower, the cliff sides became taller and huge sculptures of basalt were to be found with pretty arches and tunnels to pass through.

 

Nearing the end of the trek, there is quite a steep ascent for about 20 minutes by way of man-made steps which lead up into the pretty village of Masca. When we reached the village it was lovely to sit outside at a small roadside café and have a cold beer. Until about 50 years ago there were no roads in or out of Masca, only a dirt track so, it really was well and truly cut off from civilization apart from the ancient trails put down by the Guanches. Whilst walking the ravine, it is easy to see how the Guanches held out for so long in the barranco during the Conquest which ended in 1496, as there are many caves and places to hide. Because of the remoteness of this village, it was never attacked during the wars.

 

The village itself is beautiful. There is a small square in the centre of the village and a pretty little church. Little white-washed houses are nestled in between Palm trees and lush vegetation which are overlooked by the imposing mountains.

 

Overall, the terrain on this trek is varied; volcanic mostly with steep rocks in sections and then open plateaus, but if I needed one word to describe the landscape in this gorge it would be “magnificent”.

 

It should be noted that this walk is a moderately difficult adventure hike and involves some scrambling over rocks with some vertiginous sections in places, so you need to be reasonably fit and have good walking shoes or boots and plenty of water.

 

Once again, this was a fabulous walk with Andy Tenerife Walker and a day I will never forget and a hike that I thoroughly recommend.

 

By Lynne Scaife

Photographs courtesy of Mike Belshaw

 

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By Andy Tenerife Walker 04 Sep, 2016

Tenerife is the largest of Spain’s Canary Islands and is a popular holiday destination for us Brits, with most of us heading for the beaches and resorts of Los Cristianos and Playa de las Américas. When I came here five years ago I did what most visitors do and never left Los Cristianos the whole week I was there. When my mother announced the family would be returning to Tenerife I knew I had to go out and explore the island more this time around.

 

Before I even left England I had gone on to Google to see if there were any walking tours available. I was going away with the family but I knew I was going to be the only one who wanted to go hiking. We were staying in a hotel in Los Cristianos and to get to any hiking sites myself would have required renting a car. That’s why I decided to go for a walking tour rather than do it myself!

 

A quick search on Google led me to Tenerife Guided Walks. I sent them an email with the dates I would be in Tenerife and quickly had a response from Andy. As it turns out, he was picking up another guy from my hotel on the Friday so I decided to join them. I didn’t even ask where they were going, I was just so desperate to see more of Tenerife!

 

As it turned out we were going to the Anaga Mountains, which I must admit, I had not heard of before. Like a lot of people I knew about Mount Teide but wasn’t aware of the other mountains in Tenerife. Another great reason to book on a walking tour!

 

Macizo de Anaga is a mountain range in the northeastern part of Tenerife. The mountains were formed by a volcanic eruption about 7-9 million years ago, making it the oldest part of the island. With the highest point being 1,024m it’s the perfect place to go hiking.

 

After Andy and Louise, our other guide, had picked us up from our hotel in Los Cristianos we made our way north to Anaga which took about an hour to get to. As someone who has only been to the south of Tenerife it never occurred to me that the weather up north could be so different. Andy informed us that the weather the previous day hadn’t been great and once we reached a certain point he would be able to tell if would be able to hike the mountain that day. Thankfully Andy did have a backup plan so either way we would get to do some hiking.

 

Luckily for us the weather up north wasn’t too bad so we continued our journey to Anaga. We reached a small carpark at the side of the road and parked up. As I got out of the car I couldn’t help but feel I had dressed all wrong for this hike! I was expecting hot and sunny not misty and cold!

 

Not letting the weather spoil the hike, we proceeded up the road to an entrance in to the trails. Straight away I couldn’t believe we were still in Tenerife. This was so different to the beach resorts I was used to! I can’t believe I never knew this side of Tenerife existed!

 

Thankfully as we started getting higher, the weather started to change and we were finally starting to see some blue skies. Now I was feeling less silly for wearing my shorts and strappy top. With the blue sky in the background the views were simply breath taking.

 

What I did like about this hike was that we spent a lot of time walking through wooded trees which gave us shelter from the sun. Not only do you get shelter, you get to feel truly submerged in nature.

 

What made the tour extra special though was Andy. I really couldn’t have asked for a better tour guide! Throughout the whole tour he was offering us fun facts about Tenerife as well as information about the local wildlife. It was interesting information and helps distract you from the actual hike and lets you appreciate your surroundings.

 

How difficult was the hike?

The hike was not a difficult one, more of a moderate walk. Most of the walk was a gentle hike with a few slightly difficult moments. There was one steep decline that needed a slow walk down and as long as you were careful with your footing it was fine. I should note that you also get mountain bikers along the trail. How they go down some of these trails is beyond me!

 

The only other difficult part of the trail was a fairly long stretch uphill that was quite steep. I’m not an avid hiker as it’s still a fairly new hobby for me and I was able to do it so if you’re a keen hiker you should have no problems at all. It was also just before our lunch stop so plenty of resting time afterwards. In total the hike took us 2 and half hours to complete.

 

Tips for hiking Anaga

If you’re thinking of hiking the area here are some things for you to bear in mind.

 

1) There is only one actual toilet on this route so keep that in mind before you set off. If you’re going with Andy he will pull over at a petrol station on the way if you need to visit a toilet.

 

2) The weather up north is different to the south so you might need to bring a jacket with you just in case!

 

3) There are mountain bikers on the trail so watch out for them

 

4) There are a lot of trails along Anaga so if you’re going by yourself try and get a map so you don’t get lost

 

5) If you book a tour with Andy lunch is not provided so make sure to bring your own food

 

6) Like with any hike, especially in a hot country, make sure you bring plenty of water

 

 

Why use Tenerife Guided Walks?

If you’re looking for a good tour company in Tenerife this is the perfect one. Andy is a fellow Brit who moved out to Tenerife so there is no language barrier for English speaking visitors. He has spent many years testing out the different routes and trails to find the best ones.

 

What’s great about his tours is that due to the short groups he takes the tours can be flexible to suit everybody’s needs. If you wanted to do an easier version of the Anaga tour it can be arranged. Andy can provide the perfect packaged tour for people of any age or ability.

 

 

How to book a tour

With the online booking form it’s simple to book a tour. Simply fill in your arrival and departure dates and the preferred date you want to go hiking. If you have any questions or special requests, simply add it to the messages section. The good thing about Andy is he is quick to respond so you don’t have to wait too long for an answer.

 

The tours are becoming so popular that Andy is in the process of training Louise to run tours on her own. You can’t ask for a better sign that a tour company is good.

 

What tours do they offer?

Tenerife Guided Walks offer a variety of tours so there will be at least one tour for everyone. Most people who book a tour end up booking a second or even a third tour during their stay. Sadly for me I was unable to attend the Masca tour due to having a day of diving booked on the day they were going.

 

Some of the tours on offer are:

– Amazing Anaga

– Ancient Guanche Trail

– Enchanted Forests and Lakes

– Magnificent Masca

– Mount Gujara

– Sunset Watching

– Teide 2 Day Trek

 

As you can see you’re spoiled for choice with hiking trails in Tenerife. I can’t wait to go back and try some more!

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By Andy Tenerife Walker 04 Sep, 2016

It’s not hard to see why Masca is one of the most popular walks in Tenerife.  This ravine is incredibly beautiful with breathtaking scenery and spectacular views down to the sea.

 

Andy Tenerife Walker always does this hike uphill as opposed to downhill, mainly for safety reasons, so our journey began with a short boat trip to the beach in the bay of Masca. The boat trip in itself frames the walk nicely as the first sight of the magnificent cliffs which dominate the landscape on the approach to the bay gives an initial sense of excitement. The boat stops at a very large rock which erupts from the sea, and then there is a short walk along a Heath Robinson type jetty and a little jump is required to alight the boat. The initial ascent is very dramatic as there are some rather large boulders to negotiate during the first hour. Along the way we passed some little pools of water which I was surprised to see since the summer has been hot. Andy tells me that in winter the pools are much larger, fed by cascades of water from the numerous waterfalls down to the sea.

 

As we continued the walk, we stopped at many points to take photographs, the imposing grey black “gigantes” always in our sight which meet the deep blue colours of the sea. As we got further into the barranco, the paths became narrower, the cliff sides became taller and huge sculptures of basalt were to be found with pretty arches and tunnels to pass through.

 

The walk is lined with cactus, shrubs and many flowers during spring and much of the flora is endemic to the area. Bamboos were in profusion lining our path which eventually leads on to a small plateau. At this point, we met some cheeky little chappies called Barberry Partridge which are extremely tame in the gorge and an endemic bird to Tenerife.

 

Nearing the end of our hike, there is quite a steep ascent for about 20 minutes by way of man-made steps which lead up into the pretty village of Masca. When we reached the village it was lovely to sit in a small roadside café and have a cold beer. Until about 50 years ago there were no roads in or out of Masca, only a dirt track so this really was well and truly cut off from civilization apart from the ancient trails put down by the Guanches. Whilst walking the ravine, it is easy to see how the Guanches held out for so long in the barranco during the Conquest which ended in 1496, as there are many caves and places to hide.

 

Overall, the terrain is varied; volcanic mostly with steep rocks in sections and then open plateaus, but if I needed one word to describe the landscape in this gorge it would be “magnificent”.

 

It should be noted that this walk is a moderately difficult adventure hike and involves a little bit of scrambling over rocks with some vertiginous sections in places, so you need to be reasonably fit and have good walking shoes or boots and plenty of water.

 

Once again, this was a fabulous walk with Andy Tenerife Walker and a day I will never forget and a hike that I thoroughly recommend.

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By Andy Tenerife Walker 13 Aug, 2016

On the slopes of Pico del Teide and Montaňa Blanca there is a wondrous sight to behold; big round rocks nicknamed Teide Eggs. These can be seen from the high slopes of the neighbouring mountains.

These are scientifically known as accretion balls which are giant spheres of volcanic rock and many weigh 100s of kilos and stand taller than a man.

Following a volcanic eruption, small pieces of solidified lava started to descend faster than the underlying molten lava and gathered more outer layers like a snowball effect.

These volcanic snowballs accumulated mass very quickly and soon accelerated faster than the slow moving lava and eventually escaped to  continue their onward journey…..

The Teide Eggs are very distinctive in this area and the pictures show the dark coloured balls very clearly against the pale desert-like lunar landscape.

These eggs are now found settled on the pumice of Pico del Teide and Montaňa Blanca and create a dramatic backdrop amongst the pretty little alpine flowers found here in Spring and Summer.


By Andy Tenerife Walker 07 Aug, 2016

As I entered the evergreen fairy tale Laurel forest of Aguamansa in the north of Tenerife, I was once again awestruck by her beauty. The paths and trails in this forest are truly breath taking and there are wondrous sights to behold.

She was in a very different mood from the last time we met; melancholic – otherwise known as Autumn, and signs of Autumn were all around me. The once luscious green bracken is now desiccated and brown, the canopy is now tinged with orange, yellow and bronze amongst the green of the her personal artist’s palette, and the forest floor is now carpeted with crisp leaves from the deciduous Horse Chestnut trees and some species of Laurel. Horse chestnuts and wild mushrooms are in abundance now, the latter of which thrive at this time of year in the rich damp soil conditions of the forest.

Hues of red were also to be found in the berries of another endemic Laurel which shone like beads in the damp air. Moss clung to jet-like black rocks; its tiny roots somehow firmly fixed to provide the anchor it so needs.

As we continued on our hike, a sparkling veil of mist appeared quite suddenly and it seemed to caress the tree branches and kiss their leaves. It glided through the canopy like a veil lingering on the breeze.

And so; nearing my journey’s end on the outskirts of the forest, I happened upon yet different flora. Wild garlic, purple Vinca Major and Daphnie Gridium. Just as I thought my faithful friend had shown me all the delights she had to bestow, one final magnificent surprise met my eyes; a huge solitary Pine tree (Pino Gordo). I wondered how old it was, surely at least 400 years? Its trunk measured at least a meter in diameter and lichens draped from its branches like cobwebs on ancient candelabras lost in time. The “finale magnifico” to my walks end.

If ever a walk could be heaven on earth, this is it for me.

To book this walk or any other walk, please fill in the Contact Page.

 

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